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Sun targets BEA WebLogic users

Former BEA customers, who may be unhappy with Oracle Corp.’s plans for WebLogic as its main service-oriented architecture (SOA) server, are targeted by Sun Microsystems Inc., which today announced a migration program for its JavaCAPS SOA platform. Sun is touting the lower price and open source status of JavaCAPS for former BEA customers looking for an alternative to the Oracle version of WebLogic, said Ashesh Badani, SOA director at Sun.

Former BEA customers, who may be unhappy with Oracle Corp.’s plans for WebLogic as its main service-oriented architecture (SOA) server, are targeted by Sun Microsystems Inc., which today announced a migration program for its JavaCAPS SOA platform. Sun is touting the lower price and open source status of JavaCAPS for former BEA customers looking for an alternative to the Oracle version of WebLogic, said Ashesh Badani, SOA director at Sun.

The special offer announced on a new Sun Web page is aimed at BEA customers who are less than thrilled with becoming part of Oracle. It includes free adapters for integrating JavaCAPS into existing WebLogic SOA environments, guaranteed 12-month pricing, and a special five-day workshop with Sun’s SOA architects for the first 20 former BEA customers that sign up for the program, he said.

The open source status of JavaCAPS is touted by Badani as an advantage over WebLogic. Customers can avoid vendor lock-in by migrating to JavaCAPS, he argued. He stressed that JavaCAPS customers are not locked in with Sun if they become dissatisfied.

“If you’re not satisfied with us, we don’t want to make it difficult for you to leave us,” Badani told SearchSOA, adding that the onus is on Sun to keep JavaCAPS customers satisfied. “So it is up to us to really focus on customer satisfaction to be sure your deployment is going the way it should. If you think we’re failing you, you have the ability [to migrate away from Sun] – nothing’s easy – but it’s easier if your working with an open source code base rather than a proprietary product.”

The Sun’s offer is most likely to attract mid-market WebLogic customers seeking an alternative to Oracle, said Bradley F. Shimmin, principal analyst, application infrastructure, Current Analysis LLC.

“What Sun is going to do is find some new customers that have existing BEA investments and are looking to roll out a new deployment in a different department,” Shimmin predicted. “Sun will also be able to further capitalize on their existing customer base that already have Sun for operating system, storage, security, etc.”

Bringing JavaCAPS into an SOA environment based on WebLogic should not be a problem for former BEA customers wanting to give Sun a try, the analyst said.

“All these platforms are interoperable so there is no problem with a heterogeneous environment with different servers,” Shimmin explained.

Shimmin said this deal is unlikely to cut into Oracle’s overall market share with its newly acquired WebLogic product, but does allow Sun to introduce JavaCAPS, which has traditionally been a lower cost alternative, to some customers.

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