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Do IT and business leaders need an attitude adjustment?

It’s not uncommon for IT and business leaders to want to reap the benefits of having employees collaborate amongst each other, but the same perspective isn’t always seen when it comes to sharing technology resources. Those decision-makers need an attitude adjustment when it comes to shared workloads, according to Susan Eustis, president and CEO, co-founder of WinterGreen Research.

It may seem like common sense, but not everyone seems to get it. “It’s far more efficient to share a resource than it is to build and not use it all the time,” Eustis said. “It’s a message people don’t want to hear, but in fact, people who invested in shared workloads are the leaders in their industry segment.” Such organizations include Wal-Mart and Travelers Insurance, she noted.

In an era where organizations are trying to stay afloat, or simply get off the ground, looking towards the cloud can seem like a logical move. By sharing a workload in the cloud, costs can edge downwards. This can lead to a competitive advantage because organizations that adopt such a model can afford to offer products and services at a lower price point.

In a traditional set-up, every department within an organization would have its own set of servers and thus individually pay for the service. That however, is starting to change. Now, some companies are only paying for the portion of servers that are in use. “The virtualization workload moves on and off the cloud in the way it hasn’t happened before,” Eustis said.

The cloud isn’t the only area cost savings can be found. IT leaders might be surprised to learn that mainframes may not be the money-draining resource they have a reputation for being. “I’ve done a lot of work over the years and I’m showing the mainframe is 10 times cheaper than the servers,” Eustis said.

The message from Eustis is clear – archaic thinking isn’t going to get an organization ahead. “People have to stop being afraid of losing their job and start looking at what the reality is,” she said.

Have you seen stubborn thinking and practices hinder an organization’s ability to succeed? What are some common pitfalls you’ve seen leaders take when it comes to making IT decisions?

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